Keeping Sights On Seniors

It didn’t really matter anymore whether the grave site was kept clean or allowed to grow over. Ed would be joining Emily soon enough and then there would be nobody that would visit the site, let alone clean it. But for the sake of whatever reason he couldn’t think of, Ed cleared the leaves that had tucked themselves against the grass that bordered the stone. What was he supposed to do here? Think of her? That’s all he did all day …

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4 comments on “Keeping Sights On Seniors

  1. armywife on said:

    well said :)

  2. Angela Kamm on said:

    Your articles ALWAYS make me cry, but I look forward to them none the less. I always take time to read them because there is always something about them that I can relate to, and that’s why they make me cry. Once I cry, I feel better. So thank you for being so in tuned with life. Happy New Year. Cheers, Angela

  3. Bonnie Ecker on said:

    This article and the one “Spice It Up For Seniors” hits home with many of us baby boomers who are now looking after / taking care of / dealing with our own parents. If more nursing homes and assisted living facilities could concentrate more on their patients (aka their clients and customers that keep the income coming in!), the U.S. could employ more people and the golden years for our seniors might be a bit more shinier as they revert back to being a child.

  4. John Lester on said:

    Growing older is a natural progression of life. But how we spend our life, in busy activities that involve just activity or those that involve meaningful relationships, or if we are always set in our ways without trying something new, or if we are centered on ourselves and not reaching out to those around us by seeing, listening and even acting to meet their needs, will determine how we spend our later life.

    It takes time to listen to an older person (and also to a younger person), but that time will pay dividends as we progress.

    Thank you for your timely article, I am always encouraged by your words, Ron.

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