Biting The Synthetic Bullet

It’s 4 p.m. in late October, and it’s been raining buckets for most of the day. The phone lines are ringing off the hook. With the crisp air and saturated ground, parents everywhere want to know the status of tonight’s games. Luckily, teams can still play youth football. Until recently, the Dalton Parks and Recreation Department was in the same situation as many other facilities–teams needed to play, but it was a tough decision whether to sacrifice the integrity of …

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3 comments on “Biting The Synthetic Bullet

  1. karl Hensley on said:

    Not against synthetic but after reading this article it came across that they had no other choice.

  2. karl Hensley on said:

    Not against synthetic, but why were not all of the costs after installing the surface listed? Does this not equate to maintenance cost for the turf?
    One major item that would have been installed along with the surface would have been irrigation to control the temperature of the surface, unless they only use the surface spring and fall.

    Also it seems that they did not try any alternate measures to reduce their cost with turf. Example: weather station controlled irrigation (less water and applied when needed), fertilizing/pesticide should have been reduced over the years (if properly done) you would have only be spot spraying for weeds; painting — no brainer here, go to concentrate (with growth regulator) and sprayer and the number of times to paint is reduced.

  3. Grady Miller on said:

    Synthetic surfaces are designed for people/places that cannot manage natural surfaces. Irrigating natural grass every day for 8 months, using aerosols for football field lines suggest it may be appropriate in this instance. Fall preemergence herbicide combined with overseeding (when? fall?). They could definitely use synthetic. Alternatively, if a native soil field will be over-scheduled—then a synthetic field is useful. Author should include “building costs” along with maintenance for a truer cost comparison.

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